London International Palaeography Summer School 2016

London International Palaeography Summer School Course Overview 2016
 
Date Course Title
Monday 13 June Pre-Norman British and Irish Psalters: Art, Liturgy and Devotion (Carol Farr)
  History of Latin Scripts I: Antiquity to Caroline Minuscule (James Willoughby)
  English Palaeography, 1500-1900 (Christopher Whittick) This course is fully booked.
  How Medieval Manuscripts Were Made (Patricia Lovett)
  Introduction to Greek Palaeography I (Laura Franco)
Tuesday 14 June Introduction to Anglo-Saxon Palaeography (Debby Banham) Fully booked. A waiting list has been created.
  History of Latin Scripts II: Protogothic to Humanist (James Willoughby)
  Introduction to Visigothic Script (Ainoa Castro Correa)
  Codicology: An Introduction for Beginners (James Freeman) Fully booked.
  Introduction to Greek Palaeography II (Laura Franco)
  English Palaeography, 1500-1900 (Christopher Whittick) This is a repeat of the Monday course. Fully booked. A waiting list has been created.
Wednesday 15 June The Insular System of Scripts to A.D. 900 (Julia Crick) Fully booked. A waiting list has been created.
  Introduction to Latin Palaeography (Marigold Norbye) Fully booked. A waiting list has been created.
  Reading and Editing Renaissance English Manuscripts I (Chris Stamatakis) Day 1 of this course is fully booked.
  Codicology: An Introduction to Cataloguing (Peter Kidd) One space remaining.
Thursday 16 June An Introduction to Welsh Palaeography (Helen McKee) NB: Half-day course
  Intermediate Latin Palaeography (Marigold Norbye)
  Reading and Editing Renaissance English Manuscripts II (Chris Stamatakis)
  Codicology: A Hands-On Workshop (James Freeman and Peter Kidd)
  Vernacular Editing: Chaucer and His Contemporaries (Anthony Edwards)
Friday 17 June Approaches to the Art of Insular Manuscripts (Carol Farr)
  The Transitional Script of the Long Twelfth Century (Erik Kwakkel)
  Writing and Reading Medieval Manuscripts: Folio Layouts in Context (Anna Somfai)
  Painting a Medieval Miniature: A Practical Course (Patricia Lovett)
  German Palaeography (Dorothea McEwan and Claudia Wedepohl) Fully booked. A waiting list has been created.

The London Rare Books School also offers the following week-long courses with palaeographical content: The Medieval Book, The Book in the Ancient World, and the Anglo-Saxon and Carolingian Book.

View further details about the summer school palaeography teachers' affiliations and research interests.

On Monday13 June and Friday 17 June, there will be a lunchtime display of materials from the Museum of Writing.

Please bring a pencil: pens are not allowed when valuable manuscripts and facsimiles are in use.

Course Descriptions and Reading Lists

Monday 13 June

Pre-Norman British and Irish Psalters: Art, Liturgy and Devotion

Dr Carol Farr
Full Day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 15 students
Venue: Senate House Library

In what ways and to what purposes did early medieval scribes and artists incorporate decoration and visual images into psalter manuscripts of Britain and Ireland, 7th to 11th centuries? The course will provide an introductory survey to their art, texts and uses across the range of liturgy and prayer. We will explore iconography associated with the psalter and how it, along with the contemporary art styles, could be adapted to changing desires and needs. The graphic uses of decoration will be an overriding concern. Most of our attention will be directed to the psalters of Late Anglo-Saxon England (c. 900-1050) and Ireland c. 800-1200, although surviving early examples such as the ‘Cathach’ and Vespasian Psalter will begin our study. The course will end with examination of several facsimiles and introduction to primary and secondary references.

Bibliography

L. Webster. Anglo-Saxon Art. London: British Museum, 2012.
F. Henry. Vols 1 and 2 of her survey: Irish Art in the Early Christian Period to A.D. 800, and Irish Art during the Viking Invasions. London: Methuen & Co, 1965, 1967. Dated but the best introductory survey; affordable copies available from bookshops or on-line; in many libraries.
M.J. Toswell. The Anglo-Saxon Psalter. Turnhout: Brepols, 2014.
T. O’Neill. The Irish Hand: Scribes and their manuscripts from the earliest times. Cork University, 2014.

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History of Latin Scripts I: Antiquity to Caroline Minuscule

Dr James Willoughby (New College, Oxford)
Full day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 15 students
Venue: Senate House

One or two-day course. It is possible to take day one only of this course.

This course will provide a detailed historical overview of the scripts in use in the Latin West from Antiquity to the Renaissance. Students will be introduced to key landmarks along the road and to the varieties of names and terms that palaeographers use when discussing handwriting.

Bibliography

Detailed bibliographies will be circulated in class, but for orientation students may wish to dip into any of the following:

B. Bischoff, Latin Palaeography: Antiquity and the Middle Ages (Cambridge 1990).
[Editions also in German, French and Italian.]
M. B. Parkes, Their Hands Before Our Eyes: a Closer Look at Scribes (Aldershot 2008).
The various national catalogues of Dated and Datable Manuscripts

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English Palaeography, 1500-1900

NB: This course is fully booked. A second 'section' has opened on Tuesday 14 June.

Mr Christopher Whittick (East Sussex County Archives)
Full day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 15 students
Venue: Senate House

This course, which is open to beginners, aims to provide a brief overview of some of the documents and records written in English between 1500 and 1900. The documents to be studied, along with hand-outs on the letter-forms and abbreviations in common use during the period, will be circulated in advance of the class.  Students are expected to read the hand-outs and to attempt to transcribe the documents in advance, so as to get the most out of the course.  The class will act as a practical introduction to the transcription, understanding and interpretation of a range of the documents employed in personal, financial, legal and administrative transactions during the period. Anyone wishing to attend who has a particular document on which s/he needs help or advice is most welcome to notify the tutor in advance and bring the document along to class.

Bibliography

Detailed bibliographies and hand-outs will be circulated in the class, but those who wish to undertake some preparatory reading may find the following useful:

Giles Dawson and Laetitia Kennedy Skipton, Elizabethan Handwriting, 1560-1650 (London, Faber, 1968, reprinted by Phillimore, 1981)

F.G. Emmison, How to read local archives, 1550-1700 (London, The Historical Association, 1967)

L.C. Hector, The handwriting of English documents (London, Edward Arnold, 2nd edition, 1966, reprinted by Kohler and Coombes, 1979) Strongly recommended 

Donald Jackson, The story of writing (London, The Parker Pen Company, 1981)

Hilary Marshall, Palaeography for family and local historians (Chichester, Phillimore, 2004)

Ann Rycraft, Sixteenth and seventeenth-century handwriting, series 1 and 2 (York, Borthwick Institute of Historical Research, 2nd edition, 1969)

Joyce Irene Whalley, English handwriting, 1540-1853 (London, HMSO, 1969)

Websites

Useful bibliography: http://www.english.cam.ac.uk/ceres/ehoc/bibliography.html.

Palaeography practice: http://nationalarchives.gov.uk/palaeography/

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How Medieval Manuscripts Were Made

Ms Patricia Lovett, MBE (Professional Scribe & Illuminator)
Full day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 15 students
Venue: Senate House

Ink, quills, gold, egg tempera, lettering, parchment and vellum are all part of medieval manuscripts. Each will be considered in the context of manuscript examples and most of the techniques will be demonstrated.

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Introduction to Greek Palaeography I

Dr Laura Franco (Research Associate of RHUL Hellenic Institute)
Full day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 15 students
Venue: Senate House

Day one of a two-day course.

This is an introductory course in Greek Palaeography, consisting of two parts. Part I is a survey of the earlier history of the Greek script covering evidence from early inscriptions, through majuscule and minuscule papyri to manuscripts of the Byzantine period up to the eighth century. Part II concentrates on the Greek minuscule from the ninth to the 15th century and the first printed books. The development of the Greek script will be examined with relation to political events and cultural movements which shaped it through the centuries. Participants will learn how to transcribe a text from a facsimile of a Greek manuscript and examine basic codicological and palaeographical aspects, including the layout of the text, the use of ligatures, nomina sacra, abbreviations and colophons. This course will include practical transcription exercises which can only be undertaken with a knowledge of Greek script and of the Greek language, ancient or modern.  However, students without Greek can be accepted on the understanding that they will remain passive during these exercises.

Bibliography

R. BARBOUR, Greek Literary Hands, A.D. 400-1600 (Oxford, 1981)

P. CANART, Paleografia e codicologia greca. Una rassegna bibliografica, Littera Antiqua, 7 (Vatican City, 1991)

R. DEVREESSE, Introduction à l’étude des manuscrits grecs (Paris, 1954)

P. EASTERLING and C. HANDLEY eds., Greek Scripts: an Illustrated Introduction (London 2001)

V. GARDTHAUSEN, Griechische Palaeographie (Leipzig, 1879; repr. 1978)

B.A. VAN GRONINGEN, Short Manual of Greek Palaeography (Leiden, 1967)

H. HUNGER, Schreiben und Lesen in Byzanz (Munich, 1989)

La Paléographie grecque et byzantine, Paris 21-25 Octobre 1974, Colloques Internationaux du CNRS, 559 (Paris, 1977)

E. MIONI, Introduzione alla paleografia greca (Padua, 1973)

B.M. METZGER, Manuscripts of the Greek Bible: An Introduction to Greek Palaeography (New York-Oxford, 1981)

L. PERRIA, Grafis. Per una storia della scrittura greca libraria (Rome 2011)

E.M. THOMPSON, An Introduction to Greek and Latin Palaeography (Oxford, 1906; repr. 1975)

E.G. TURNER, Greek Papyri: An Introduction (Oxford, 1986)

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TUESDAY 14 JUNE

Introduction to Anglo-Saxon Palaeography

NB: This course is fully booked and a waiting list has been created.

Dr Debby Banham (Birkbeck and University of Cambridge)
Full day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 12 students
Venue: Senate House

This course will introduce students to the scripts in use in England before the Norman Conquest, both those of Insular origin, and those deriving from Continental practice, as well as those that developed within England itself. We shall trace the historical development of writing in early medieval England, and get plenty of practice in reading. Abbreviations and special Old English characters will be elucidated as we go. No previous knowledge is required, either of palaeography or of relevant languages.

Bibliography

Julian Brown, A Palaeographer’s View (Harvey Miller, 1993)

Michelle Brown, Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts (British Library, 1991)

also her Manuscripts from the Anglo-Saxon Age (British Library, 2007)

and as ever her A Guide to Western Historical Scripts (British Library, 1990)

Gale Owen-Crocker, ed., Working with Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts (Exeter UP, 2009)

Mary P. Richards, ed., Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts: Basic Readings (Routledge, 1994)

Jane Roberts, Guide to Scripts used in English Writings up to 1500 (British Library, 2005)

Alex Rumble, ed., Writing and Texts in Anglo-Saxon England (D. S. Brewer, 2006)

Donald Scragg, A Conspectus of Scribal Hands Writing English, 960–1100 (D. S. Brewer, 2012)

Peter Stokes, English Vernacular Minuscule from Æthelred to Cnut, c.990 - c. 1035 (D. S. Brewer, 2014)

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History of Latin Scripts II: Protogothic to Humanist

Dr James Willoughby (New College, Oxford)
Full day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 15 students
Venue: Senate House

One or two-day course. It is possible to take day two only of this course.

This course will provide an historical overview of the scripts in use in the Latin West from Antiquity to the Renaissance. Students will be introduced to key landmarks along the road and to the varieties of names and terms that palaeographers use when discussing handwriting.

Bibliography

Detailed bibliographies will be circulated in class, but for orientation students may wish to dip into any of the following:

B. Bischoff, Latin Palaeography: Antiquity and the Middle Ages (Cambridge 1990).

[Editions also in German, French and Italian.]

M. B. Parkes, Their Hands Before Our Eyes: a Closer Look at Scribes (Aldershot 2008).

The various national catalogues of Dated and Datable Manuscripts

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Introduction to Visigothic Script

Dr Ainoa Castro Correa (King's College London)
Full day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 15 students
Venue: Senate House Library

Almost all written production in what is now Spain and Portugal from the 8th to the 12th centuries was done in what is called ‘Visigothic script’, which evolved in the Peninsula from the scripts of the Late Roman Empire just as Merovingian, Insular, and Beneventan scripts did in their corresponding geographical areas. In this course, students will gain knowledge about not only the origin of Visigothic script but also about its main typological and geographical variants and its stages of evolution throughout the centuries, these aspects being discussed through digital reproductions of significant manuscript examples.

This course is open to everyone interested in medieval manuscript production, with a focus on the Iberian Peninsula’s manuscript material. Its main aim is to familiarise the participants with a particular model of medieval script, with those letters, signs, and abbreviations that characterise Visigothic script. Therefore, no previous experience is required although students with at least a basic training in palaeography will particularly benefit from the course. There will be some transcription exercises where those students who wish to do so will have the opportunity to practice reading the script.

Bibliography

J. Alturo Perucho, A. Castro Correa and M. Torras Cortina (eds.), La escritura visigótica en la Península Ibérica. Nuevas aportaciones (Bellaterra, 2012).

Mª J. Azevedo Santos, Da visigótica à carolina, a escrita em Portugal de 882 a 1172 (Lisbon, 1994).

M. C. Díaz y Díaz et al., Corpus de códices visigóticos (Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 1999).

A. Millares Carlo, Tratado de Paleografía española (Madrid, 1983).

I. Velázquez Soriano, Documentos de época visigoda escritos en pizarra (Turnhout, 2000).

Website:
Littera Visigothica http://litteravisigothica.com/

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Codicology: An Introduction for Beginners

NB: This course is fully booked. A waiting list has been created.

Dr James Freeman (British Library)
Full day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 15 students
Venue: Senate House Library

Codicology is the study of the book as a physical object.  Participants will learn how the components of medieval books were prepared and assembled.  The course will show students how to identify and interpret evidence of these processes that survives within medieval books, and will provide a solid grounding in the technical vocabulary used to describe them.  Students will also be shown how to handle and examine manuscripts correctly.  Such knowledge is essential for anyone contemplating or engaged upon first-hand work with medieval books.

Students can choose to follow one, two or three days of codicology.  In the interests of fairness and balance, five places for day 2 will initially be allocated to persons not attending day 1 and ten places for day 3 will initially be allocated evenly between students of day 1 and of day 2; the rest of the places will be available on a first come first served basis.

Bibliography

Bernhard Bischoff, Latin palaeography: antiquity and the Middle Ages, trans. Daíbhí Ó Cróinín and David Ganz (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990): chapter on ‘Codicology’.

Raymond Clemens & Timothy Graham, Introduction to Manuscript Studies (Ithaca: New York University Press, 2007).

Richard Gameson (ed.), Cambridge History of the Book in Britain, vol. I: c. 400-1100 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011): Chapter 2.

Christopher de Hamel, Scribes and Illuminators (London: British Museum Press, 1992).

Nigel J. Morgan & Rodney M. Thomson (eds), Cambridge History of the Book in Britain, vol. II: 1100-1400 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008): Chapters 3, 4 & 5. 

Michelle P. Brown’s online glossary is useful for understanding certain technical terms, and is illustrated with examples from British Library manuscripts:

http://www.bl.uk/catalogues/illuminatedmanuscripts/glossary.asp

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Introduction to Greek Palaeography II

Dr Laura Franco (Research Associate of RHUL Hellenic Institute)
Full day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 15 students
Venue: Senate House

Day two of a two-day course.

This is an introductory course in Greek Palaeography, consisting of two parts. Part I is a survey of the earlier history of the Greek script covering evidence from early inscriptions, through majuscule and minuscule papyri to manuscripts of the Byzantine period up to the eighth century. Part II concentrates on the Greek minuscule from the ninth to the 15th century and the first printed books. The development of the Greek script will be examined with relation to political events and cultural movements which shaped it through the centuries. Participants will learn how to transcribe a text from a facsimile of a Greek manuscript and examine basic codicological and palaeographical aspects, including the layout of the text, the use of ligatures, nomina sacra, abbreviations and colophons. This course will include practical transcription exercises which can only be undertaken with a knowledge of Greek script and of the Greek language, ancient or modern.  However, students without Greek can be accepted on the understanding that they will remain passive during these exercises.

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English Palaeography, 1500-1900

NB: This course is fully booked.

Mr Christopher Whittick (East Sussex County Archives)
Full day - from 9.45 to 16.45
Maximum: 15 students
Venue: Senate House

This is a repeat of the course offered on Monday (see above).

WEDNESDAY 15 JUNE

The Insular System of Scripts to A.D. 900

This course is fully booked and a waiting list has been created.

Professor Julia Crick (King's College London)
Full Day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 12 students
Venue: Senate House Library

This course investigates the history of script in Britain and Ireland before and during the first Viking age. It will discuss the classification of minuscule before 900 using the principles developed by T. Julian Brown, identifying characteristic letter-forms, ligatures and abbreviations. Where practicable we will work from datable and localizable examples. Latin is not a prerequisite for enrolment but the course will include some voluntary reading practice in order for members to gain familiarity with the practices of Insular scribes. This class is aimed at students who have some training or experience in palaeography.

Bibliography

A Palaeographer’s View: Selected Writings of Julian Brown, ed. Janet Bately, Michelle Brown, and Jane Roberts (London, Harvey Miller, 1993)

Jane Roberts, A Guide to Scripts Used in English Writings up to 1500 (London, British Library Publications, 2005)

The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain, volume I, c. 400-1100, ed. Richard Gameson (Cambridge, Cambridge University Press 2012)

Gale Owen-Crocker, Working with Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts (Exeter, Exeter University Press, 2009)

Michelle P. Brown, Manuscripts from the Anglo-Saxon Age (London, British Library Publications, 2007)

Michelle P. Brown, A Guide to Western Historical Scripts from Antiquity to 1600 (London, The British Library, 1990)

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Introduction to Latin Palaeography

NB: This course is fully booked. A waiting list has been created.

Dr Marigold Norbye (UCL)
Full day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 15 students
Venue: Senate House

This course will provide a brief overview of the main elements of Latin palaeography, concentrating on scripts of the later medieval period (1100-1500).  Whilst showing the most common abbreviation symbols and the evolution of letter forms, the course will consist of practical exercises, transcribing several different types of script.  Participants must have at least elementary Latin in order to benefit from the course.  It would be useful if they could indicate whether they have any previous experience of palaeography when applying.

Bibliography

B. Bischoff, Latin Palaeography:  Antiquity and the Middle Ages, transl. from German by D. O’Croinin and D. Ganz (Cambridge, 1990)
M.P. Brown, A Guide to Western Historical Scripts from Antiquity to 1600 (London, 1990)
S.H. Thomson, Latin Bookhands of the Later Middle Ages (Cambridge, 1969)
L.C. Hector, The Handwriting of English Documents, 2nd edn (London, 1968)
E.A. Gooder, Latin for Local History, 2nd edn (London, 1978)

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Reading and Editing Renaissance English Manuscripts I

NB: This course is fully booked and a waiting list has been created. Places are still available for Day 2 of the course.

Dr Chris Stamatakis (UCL), with a session by Dr Heather Windram (University of Cambridge)
Full day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 15 students
Venue: Senate House

One- or two-day course. It is possible to take day one only of this course.

This course will offer participants an opportunity to practise transcribing a variety of literary manuscripts written in English in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. These texts will include examples of both poetry and prose, and we will in addition look at a selection of marginalia appended to both manuscript and printed works. Each of the passages analysed contains intriguing puzzles and exciting scribal practices. In the second half of the day, we will turn our attention to some of the theoretical, and practical, challenges involved in editing such documents. We will discuss the fascinating ways in which transcription, editing, and literary criticism are all entwined in these case studies. In addition, we will explore variant copies of a given poem, and in the final hour we will consider some computer-based methods for mapping out relations between variant manuscripts of a given text. An ability to read early modern hands (secretary, italic, mixed) is not essential but would be useful, since much of the course will involve close scrutiny of early modern manuscript texts.

Bibliography

Early modern English manuscript culture

Beal, Peter, In Praise of Scribes: Manuscripts and their Makers in Seventeenth-Century England (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1998).

Beal, Peter, A Dictionary of English Manuscript Terminology, 1450–2000 (Oxford: Oxford University Press).

Love, Harold, Scribal Publication in Seventeenth-Century England (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993).

Marotti, Arthur F., Manuscript, Print, and the English Renaissance Lyric (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1995).

Woudhuysen, H.R., Sir Philip Sidney and the Circulation of Manuscripts, 1558-1640 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996), of which concentrate on Part I, ‘The Circulation of Manuscripts, 1558-1640’.

How to read early modern handwriting

Dawson, Giles E. and Laetitia Kennedy-Skipton, Elizabethan Handwriting 1500–1650: A Guide to the Reading of Documents and Manuscripts (London, Faber, 1968).

English Handwriting, 1500–1700: an online course: www.english.cam.ac.uk/ceres/ehoc

The National Archives, Palaeography: www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/palaeography

Editing early modern manuscripts

Hunter, Michael, ‘How to Edit a Seventeenth-Century Manuscript: Principles and Practice’, The Seventeenth Century 10 (1995): 277–310.

Hunter, Michael, Editing Early Modern Texts: An Introduction to Principles and Practice (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2007; repr. 2009).

Tanselle, G. Thomas, ‘The Editing of Historical Documents’, Studies in Bibliography 31 (1978): 1–56.

Early modern spelling and punctuation

Lass, Roger, ed., The Cambridge History of the English Language, Volume III: 1476-1776 (Cambridge: C.U.P., 1999): see esp. Vivian Salmon, ‘Orthography and Punctuation’.

Salmon, Vivian, ‘The Spelling and Punctuation of Shakespeare’s Time’, in Stanley Wells and Gary Taylor, eds., William Shakespeare: The Complete Works. Original Spelling Edition (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1986).

An introduction to the computer-based method being presented:

http://www.plosbiology.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pbio.1001069

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Codicology: An Introduction to Cataloguing

Mr Peter Kidd
Full day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 15 students
Venue: Senate House Library

This course will address ways in which the physical properties of manuscripts can be described, including discussion of why some practices are preferable to others. It will systematically address the stages involved in the description of a manuscript, from its shelfmark, material and dimensions to its most recent (re-)binding. It will be assumed that participants have at least theoretical knowledge of the basic codicological features of page-preparation and quire construction (prickings, rulings, catchwords, leaf-signatures, etc.).

Students can choose to follow one, two or three days of codicology.  In the interests of fairness and balance, five places for day 2 will initially be allocated to persons not attending day 1 and ten places for day 3 will initially be allocated evenly between students of day 1 and of day 2-only; the rest of the places will be available on a first come first served basis.

Bibliography

No previous reading is required or expected; a detailed Bibliography will be handed out as part of the course. Anyone wishing to start thinking about the issues involved could look at:

-- Raymond Clemens and Timothy Graham, Introduction to Manuscript Studies (Cornell University Press, 2007), chapter 9.

-- A.C. de la Mare, Catalogue of the Collection of Medieval Manuscripts Bequeathed to the Bodleian Library, Oxford by James P.R. Lyell (Bodleian Library, 1971), pp.xxxi-xxxiii and passim.

-- Peter Kidd, Medieval Manuscripts From the Collection of T.R. Buchanan in the Bodleian Library, Oxford (Bodleian Library, 2000), pp.xxxiii-xxxvi and passim.

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THURSDAY 16 JUNE 

An Introduction to Welsh Palaeography
Intermediate Latin Palaeography
Reading and Editing Renaissance English Manuscripts II
Codicology: A Hands-On Workshop
Vernacular Editing: Chaucer and His Contemporaries

An Introduction to Welsh Palaeography

Dr Helen McKee (Royal Holloway, University of London)
Half day - from 10.00 to 13.00
Maximum: 15 students
Venue: Senate House

This intermediate level course aims to introduce participants to the essentials of medieval Welsh book production, from the time of the earliest survivals (eighth century) until the late medieval period; the focus, however, will be on the first half of this period (up to c. 1100).  We will study Welsh script in the context of contemporary historical and cultural developments, and there will be the opportunity to practise reading from facsimiles of different periods.

Knowledge of Welsh is not necessary for this course, and in any case the majority of manuscript material covered will be in Latin. Some knowledge of Latin would be very useful, but is not essential.  This course would be ideal for anyone who has attended one of the introductory courses on Insular or Anglo-Saxon palaeography and who would like to broaden their field of knowledge.

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Intermediate Latin Palaeography

Dr Marigold Norbye
Full day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 15 students
Venue: Senate House

This course is aimed at those who attended the previous day’s introduction to palaeography and who want to gain more practice in transcription.  It is also open to students with some experience in Latin palaeography who wish to refresh or improve their skills.  Participants must have at least elementary Latin in order to benefit from the course.  It would be useful if they could indicate what previous experience of palaeography they have when applying.

Bibliography

B. Bischoff, Latin Palaeography:  Antiquity and the Middle Ages, transl. from German by D. O’Croinin and D. Ganz (Cambridge, 1990)
M.P. Brown, A Guide to Western Historical Scripts from Antiquity to 1600 (London, 1990)
S.H. Thomson, Latin Bookhands of the Later Middle Ages (Cambridge, 1969)
L.C. Hector, The Handwriting of English Documents, 2nd edn (London, 1968)
E.A. Gooder, Latin for Local History, 2nd edn (London, 1978)

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Reading and Editing Renaissance English Manuscripts II

Dr Chris Stamatakis (UCL)
Full day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 15 students
Venue: Senate House

Day two of a two-day course.

A class devoted to examining further examples of Renaissance English palaeography – secretary and mixed hands – and an opportunity for students to bring their own examples for discussion or analysis.  Aimed at students having attended day one of this course, although applications will be considered from others if they already have some basic fluency in reading early modern hands.  Day 2 is devoted to examining further examples of Renaissance English palaeography - secretary and mixed hands - and provides an opportunity for students to bring their own examples.

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Codicology: A Hands-On Workshop

Dr James Freeman and Mr Peter Kidd
Full day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 15 students
Venue: Senate House Library

This course is aimed primarily at those who have attended one or both of the codicology courses, although it is also open to students who have had prior training in codicology but lack direct experience with manuscripts.  In this course, students will put into practice some of the theoretical skills they have learnt, by carrying out hands-on exercises that reflect their training or experience so far, using manuscripts from the Senate House collection.  The group will discuss some of the practical issues encountered and the lessons learnt.

Students can choose to follow one, two or three days of codicology.  In the interests of fairness and balance, five places for day 2 will initially be allocated to persons not attending day 1 and ten places for day 3 will initially be allocated evenly between students of day 1 and of day 2-only; the rest of the places will be available on a first come first served basis.

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Vernacular Editing: Chaucer and his Contemporaries

Professor Anthony Edwards (University of Kent)
Full day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 12 students
Venue: Senate House Library

This course will examine the history of English vernacular editing, focusing on Geoffrey Chaucer, but with reference to contemporary authors and works, including William Langland’s Piers Plowman and other works from the later fourteenth or fifteenth centuries. It will consider the history of procedures for establishing texts and the use by editors of manuscript and other evidence to produce. It will also examine the evolution of the roles of such procedures as collation, emendation, annotation and manuscript description in preparing editions as well as the concept of ‘edition’ itself as it relates to vernacular works produced in the later Middle Ages in England.

Bibliography

W. W. Greg, ‘The Rationale of Copy Text,’ reprinted in his Collected Papers, ed. J. C. Maxwell (Oxford, 1966), pp. 374-91.

George Kane, ‘Conjectural Emendation,’ and ‘ “Good” and “Bad” Manuscripts: Texts and Critics,’ both reprinted in George Kane, Chaucer and Langland: Historical and Textual Approaches (Berkeley, CA, 1989), pp. 150-161, 206-13.

Paul Ruggiers, ed., Editing Chaucer: The Great Tradition (Norman, OK, 1984)

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FRIDAY 17 JUNE

Approaches to the Art of Insular Manuscripts

Dr Carol Farr
Full day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 15 students
Venue: Senate House

A survey of art in manuscripts produced in Irish and Anglo-Saxon contexts, 7th to 9th centuries, that will explore methods for analytic looking and inquiry. Palaeographic, textual and historical points of view will be emphasized. How may decoration and pictures in a manuscript contribute to understanding it as gained through palaeographic and codicological study? What are the important commentaries and other textual works that relate to the images in a manuscript? How can images and decoration in Insular manuscripts further inform historical study of early medieval Ireland and Anglo-Saxon England? Some of the most important primary and secondary sources, including art historical and archaeological material, will be introduced and used in lecture and discussion. The course will include hands-on exercises using facsimiles of manuscripts.

Bibliography

Henderson, George. From Durrow to Kells: the Insular Gospel-books 650-800. London: Thames and Hudson, 1987.

Barbet-Massin, Dominique. L’Enluminure et le sacré: Irlande et Grande-Bretagne VIIe-VIIIe siècles. Paris: Université Paris-Sorbonne, 2013.

Brown, Michelle P. The Lindisfarne Gospels and the Early Medieval World. London: British Library, 2011.

Meehan, Bernard. The Book of Kells. London: Thames and Hudson, 2012

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The Transitional Script of the Long Twelfth Century

Dr Erik Kwakkel (Leiden University)
Full day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 15 students
Venue: Senate House Library

This class develops two threads of inquiry. The main aim is to make sense of the transitional script observed across Europe and the British Isles from the end of the eleventh to the early thirteenth century. Addressed as either late Caroline or Pre-/Proto-Gothic, the script is in a constant state of flux, acquiring new “Gothic” features and shedding traits of Caroline. The seminar will investigate the development of this transitional script, effectively showing how Caroline Minuscule became Gothic Textualis. In addition, it will highlight the significant geographical differences in the script’s execution. The secondary aim is to develop the students’ ability to describe palaeographical features and their development in a quantifiable manner, which is key to studying the transitional script of the long twelfth century. No previous experience with Latin and palaeography is required.

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Writing and Reading Medieval Manuscripts: Folio Layouts in Context

Dr Anna Somfai (Central European University)
Full day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 12 students
Venue: Senate House Library

The course explores, covering the period from the 6th to the 15th centuries, what a close look at folio layouts of manuscripts can reveal about medieval writing and reading practices and the cognitive processes behind the design. We look at the production of the layout (ruling, using a hierarchy of scripts, planning the text-image spatial relationship, planting bookmarks, etc.) and the consecutive engagement with the content (the annotator-reader's textual and visual glosses, intellectual and physical additions and cut-outs). The layout reflects the physical and intellectual production and use of the manuscripts and the assumptions as to how to best transmit a specific body of knowledge, thus the design is directly relevant to the transmission of ideas and to medieval teaching and learning practices. Participants of the course are invited to create and discuss their own design of a folio in order to understand the intricacies of medieval layout design. Original manuscript folios will be studied in class.

Bibliography

Mise en page et mise en texte du livre manuscrit, ed. Henri-Jean Martine, Jean Vezin, Paris 1990

Murdoch, John E., Album of Science. Antiquity and the Middle Ages, New York 1984

Reading Medieval Images. The Art Historian and the Object, ed. Elizabeth Sears, Thelma K. Thomas, Michigan 2002

Sherman, Claire Richter, Imaging Aristotle. Verbal and Visual Representations in Fourteenth-Century France, Berkeley, Los Angeles, Oxford, 1995

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Painting a Medieval Miniature: A Practical Course

Ms Patricia Lovett, MBE (Professional Scribe and Illuminator)
Full day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 15 students
Venue: Senate House

This course will follow through the process of preparing parchment, transferring a copied image on to parchment, using real gold leaf, painting with the very fine sable brushes similar to those of mediæval illuminators and ending up with a copied mediæval miniature to take home. (No experience required.)

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German Palaeography

NB: This course is fully booked and a waiting list has been created.

Dr Dorothea McEwan (Warburg Institute) and Dr Claudia Wedepohl (Warburg Institute)
Full day - from 10.00 to 17.00
Maximum: 10 students
Venue: Senate House

This German Palaeography class is a reading class. Its aim is to familiarize students with a number of different handwritings. A variety of texts (in photocopies) will be examined and read: private correspondence, official correspondence of German courts and the Habsburg monarchy, petitions by individuals, replies by authorities, appeals, etc., from the 17th to the 20th centuries. The course will be flexible in as much as it will be possible to present documents from different centuries and handwriting styles in order to suit the needs of the participants. It is therefore important to state on the Registration Form which particular research interests the applicant is pursuing.

Bibliography

Karin Schneider, Palaeographie und Handschriftenkunde für Germanisten, Tübingen (2nd edition) 2009.

Kurt Dülfer, Hans Enno Korn, Schrifttafeln zur deutschen Paläographie des 16.-20. Jahrhunderts, Marburg (10th edition) 2000.

Karl Gladt, Deutsche Schriftfibel. Anleitung und Lektüre der Kurrentschrift des 17.-20. Jahrhunderts, Graz 1974.

Useful web links

http://www.kurrentschrift.net/

http://gonline.univie.ac.at/htdocs/site/browse.php?a=2255&arttyp=k

http://gonline.univie.ac.at/htdocs/upload/File/import/2543.pdf

Beinert, Wolfgang, Typolexikon.de. Das Lexikon der deutschen Typographie (2001): http://www.typolexikon.de

http://www.adfontes.uzh.ch/1000.php

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