Friday 18 - Saturday 19 January 2019

Students can choose from the following:

Friday 18 January

Digital Approaches to Palaeography: Principles, Methods and Tools

Dr Christopher Ohge (University of London)
Maximum: 15 Students

This course surveys the principles and developing methods of digital palaeography. It has three inter-related objectives: to introduce students to the methodological and theoretical underpinnings of what has recently made palaeography "digital"; to demonstrate computational workflows and survey some existing tools for capturing and organising palaeographic data; and to examine the problems of palaeography studies in the editing of nineteenth- and twentieth-century texts. The elements of theory and method will be complemented with hands-on exercises using digital tools. Moreover, students will carry this practice into the realm of digital editing, showing how palaeography can complement digital diplomatic editing. We will also discuss some of the promises and challenges, more generally, of digital approaches to palaeography.

Students do not need to have any prior experience in programming.

Bibliography

Arianna Ciula, "Digital palaeography: What is digital about it?", Digital Scholarship in the Humanities, Volume 32, Issue suppl_2, 1 December 2017, Pages ii89–ii105, https://doi.org/10.1093/llc/fqx042

Guy Lorette, “Handwriting recognition or reading? What is the situation at the dawn of the 3rd millennium?” International Journal on Document Analysis and Recognition 2 (1999).

Peter Stokes, "Digital approaches to paleography and book history: some challenges, present and future", Frontiers in Digital Humanities, 29 October 2015 | https://doi.org/10.3389/fdigh.2015.00005.

Melissa M. Terras and Paul Robertson, Image to Interpretation: An Intelligent System to Aid Historians in Reading the Vindolanda Texts (Oxford 2006).

Introduction to Codicology

Dr James Freeman (Cambridge University Library)
Maximum: 16 students

Codicology is the study of the book as a physical object.  Participants will learn how the components of medieval books were prepared and assembled.  The course will show students how to identify and interpret evidence of these processes that survives within medieval books, and will provide a solid grounding in the technical vocabulary used to describe them.  Students will also be shown how to handle and examine manuscripts correctly.  Such knowledge is essential for anyone contemplating or engaged upon first-hand work with medieval books.

Bibliography

Bernhard Bischoff, Latin palaeography: antiquity and the Middle Ages, trans. Daíbhí Ó Cróinín and David Ganz (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990): chapter on ‘Codicology’.
Raymond Clemens & Timothy Graham, Introduction to Manuscript Studies (Ithaca: New York University Press, 2007).
Richard Gameson (ed.), Cambridge History of the Book in Britain, vol. I: c. 400-1100 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011): Chapter 2.
Christopher de Hamel, Scribes and Illuminators (London: British Museum Press, 1992).
Nigel J. Morgan & Rodney M. Thomson (eds), Cambridge History of the Book in Britain, vol. II: 1100-1400 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008): Chapters 3, 4 & 5
Michelle P. Brown’s online glossary is useful for understanding certain technical terms, and is illustrated with examples from British Library manuscripts: http://www.bl.uk/catalogues/illuminatedmanuscripts/glossary.asp  

Introduction to Early Modern English Palaeography

Mr Christopher Whittick (East Sussex Record Office) 
Maximum: 15 students

This course will introduce students to the basics of post-medieval palaeography, and will go on to examine a variety of administrative and literary manuscripts written in English in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. We will examine the process of reading, trace the relationship and distinctions between early modern hands (secretary, italic, and mixed) and both read out loud in class and undertake some transcription. No prior knowledge of early modern handwriting is required: images of the documents which we shall study, along with teaching material and crib sheets, will be circulated by email in advance of the course.

Bibliography


F.G. Emmison, How to read local archives, 1550-1700 (London, The Historical Association, 1967)
L.C. Hector, The handwriting of English documents (London, Edward Arnold, 2nd edition, 1966, reprinted by Kohler and Coombes, 1979) Strongly recommended 
Donald Jackson, The story of writing (London, The Parker Pen Company, 1981)
Joyce Irene Whalley, English handwriting, 1540-1853 (London, HMSO, 1969)

Introduction to Latin Palaeography

Dr Marigold Norbye (UCL)
Maximum: 15 students

This course will provide a brief overview of the main elements of Latin palaeography, concentrating on scripts of the later medieval period (1100-1500).  Whilst showing the most common abbreviation symbols and the evolution of letter forms, the course will consist of practical exercises, transcribing several different types of script.  Participants must have at least elementary Latin in order to benefit from the course.  It would be useful if they could indicate whether they have any previous experience of palaeography when applying.

Bibliography

B. Bischoff, Latin Palaeography:  Antiquity and the Middle Ages, transl. from German by D. O’Croinin and D. Ganz (Cambridge, 1990)
M.P. Brown, A Guide to Western Historical Scripts from Antiquity to 1600 (London, 1990)
S.H. Thomson, Latin Bookhands of the Later Middle Ages (Cambridge, 1969)
L.C. Hector, The Handwriting of English Documents, 2nd edn (London, 1968)
E.A. Gooder, Latin for Local History, 2nd edn (London, 1978)

 
Saturday 19 January

The Book of Kells and its contemporaries

Dr Carol Farr 
Maximum: 15 students

A day’s study of the Book of Kells, its art and its relationships to decorated Latin manuscripts ca. AD 800. We will see it within the cultural significance of early medieval decorated manuscripts and examine reasons for its decoration. Beginning with a concise survey of Kells’ contents to see how it is both unique and typical of its time, we will explore questions of its date and place of origin, as well as its later medieval history. Its art, design and scripts will then be compared with other decorated manuscripts from Ireland and Britain. Moreover, its contemporaries from selected continental contexts will be compared with it as an object and with elements of its art to understand how it belonged to a wider context as well as its ‘Insular’ one. We will conclude with a look at the 1990 facsimile alongside print and digital facsimiles of some other manuscripts.

Bibliography

Meehan, Bernard. The Book of Kells official guide.  London: Thames and Hudson, 2018. A concise introduction that references recent scholarship; widely available and reasonably priced.
Meehan, Bernard. The Book of Kells. London: Thames & Hudson, 2012. The best print illustrations; valuable observations by the former Keeper of Manuscripts at Trinity College, Dublin.
Webster, Leslie. Anglo-Saxon art. London: British Museum, 2012. Excellent survey of early medieval art from Britain, in all media.
Nees, Lawrence. Early Medieval Art. Oxford: Oxford University, 2002. Accessible survey including art c. 800 in western Europe, all media.
Farr, Carol A. The Book of Kells: its function and audience. London: British Library, 1997. Some paperback editions still available at reasonable prices from on-line dealers; in SHL libraries.
Pulliam, Heather. Word and Image in the Book of Kells. Dublin: Four Courts 2006. A monograph on the minor decoration.
Barbet-Massin, Dominque. L’Enluminure et le sacré: Irland et Grande-Bretagne VIIe-VIIIe siècles. Paris: Université Paris-Sorbonne, 2013. Thorough survey of book art of Ireland and Britain.
Henderson, George. From Durrow to Kells: the Insular gospel-books 650-800. London: Thames and Hudson, 1987. Still the best survey in English of Insular manuscript art.

Cataloguing Medieval Manuscripts

Dr James Freeman (Cambridge University Library) 
Maximum: 15 students

The purpose of cataloguing a medieval manuscript is to render in print in a consistent and clear manner certain of its key characteristics.  In their most modern incarnations, these descriptions include but are not limited to: the manuscript's dimensions, the number and structure of its leaves, its binding, its textual and decorative contents, its specific or estimated date and place of origin, an identification of the script used and (if possible) the scribe responsible, the manuscript's provenance, and any other relevant details.  Participants will learn about the evolution of the discipline by examining the commonalities and developments in descriptions published over the last two centuries.  The course will also prompt reflections upon the varying styles and emphases of manuscript descriptions and how this might be determined by the purposes to which a description might be put.  Participants will be introduced to the key principles that should guide the modern-day manuscripts cataloguer and will have the opportunity to put their codicological knowledge of how medieval books were made to the purpose of producing a structured physical description.  Attendance at the course 'Introduction to Codicology' is therefore strongly encouraged, since its content will lay the foundations for the lessons of this course.  Some knowledge of palaeography will also be of value, though is not strictly essential.

Bibliography

Please refer to the bibliography given for the course 'Introduction to Codicology'.

Participants should also familiarise themselves with as many published descriptions of medieval manuscripts as possible prior to the course, including but not limited to the following:

Collection catalogues:

- 'A catalogue of the Harleian manuscripts in the British Museum' ([London: Eyre & Strahan], 1808-12) - esp. pp. 27-29 of the preface. 

-- available online: https://archive.org/details/CatalogueOfTheHarleianManuscripts1

- 'A catalogue of the manuscripts in the Cottonian library deposited in the British Museum' ([London: Hansard, printer], 1802) - esp. pp. xiv-xv of the preface.

-- available online: https://archive.org/details/ACatalogueOfTheManuscripts1802

- 'A catalogue of the manuscripts preserved in the library of the University of Cambridge' (Cambridge: University Press, 1856-1867)

-- available online: https://archive.org/details/catalogueofmanus01cambuoft

- 'Catalogue of the Stowe manuscripts in the British Museum' (London: Printed by order of the Trustees, 1895)

-- available online: https://archive.org/details/cataloguestowem00ocogoog

- any of the Descriptive Catalogues of manuscripts in Cambridge College libraries, compiled by M.R. James

-- usually available online on Internet Archive

- G.F. Warner & J.P. Gilson, 'Catalogue of western manuscripts in the old Royal and King's collections' ([London]: The Trustees, 1921)

-- available online: https://archive.org/details/BMCatalogueOfWesternMssRoyal1

- R.A.B. Mynors, 'Catalogue of the Manuscripts of Balliol College, Oxford' (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1963)

- N.R. Ker, 'Medieval Manuscripts in British Libraries' (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1969-1992)

- P.J. Kidd, 'A descriptive catalogue of the medieval manuscripts of the Queen's College, Oxford' (Oxford: Oxford Bibliographical Society, 2016)

- R.M. Thomson, 'A descriptive catalogue of the medieval manuscripts in the library of Peterhouse, Cambridge' (Woodbridge: D.S. Brewer, 2016)

Art-historical catalogues:

- Any of the volumes in the series 'A survey of manuscripts illuminated in the British Isles', general editor J.J.G. Alexander (1975-1996)

- Any of the volumes in the series 'Illuminated manuscripts in Cambridge: A catalogue of western book illumination in the Fitzwilliam Museum and the Cambridge colleges', general editors N.J. Morgan and Stella Panayotova (2009-)

Textual catalogues:

- D.W. Singer, Catalogue of Latin and vernacular alchemical manuscripts in Great Britain and Ireland dating from before the XVI century (Brussels: Lamertin, 1928-1931)

- N.R. Ker, 'Catalogue of manuscripts containing Anglo-Saxon' (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1957, reissued with supplement 1990)

- M.C. Seymour, 'A Catalogue of Chaucer Manuscripts' (Aldershot: Scolar, 1995-1997)

- Ralph Hanna, 'The English manuscripts of Richard Rolle: a descriptive catalogue' (Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 2010)

- Any of the volumes in the series 'Index of Middle English Prose'.

Intermediate Early Modern English Palaeography 

Mr Christopher Whittick (East Sussex Record Office) 
Maximum: 15 students

This course will build on the existing palaeographical skills of students to explore both administrative and literary manuscripts which are written in more challenging hands or with more complex content, written between the sixteenth and the nineteenth centuries. As well as palaeography, the course will include some training in administrative history, and students are encouraged to submit texts of their own with which they would welcome assistance. Some prior knowledge of early modern handwriting is required: images of the documents which we shall study, along with teaching material and crib sheets, will be circulated by email in advance of the course.

Bibliography

Hilary Marshall, Palaeography for family and local historians (Chichester, Phillimore, 2004)
Ann Rycraft, Sixteenth and seventeenth-century handwriting, series 1 and 2 (York, Borthwick Institute of Historical Research, 2nd edition, 1969)

Giles Dawson and Laetitia Kennedy Skipton, Elizabethan Handwriting, 1560-1650 (London, Faber, 1968, reprinted by Phillimore, 1981)

Intermediate Latin Palaeography

Dr Marigold Norbye (UCL)
Maximum: 15 students

This course is aimed at those who attended the previous day’s introduction to palaeography and who want to gain more practice in transcription.  It is also open to students with some experience in Latin palaeography who wish to refresh or improve their skills.  Participants must have at least elementary Latin in order to benefit from the course.  It would be useful if they could indicate what previous experience of palaeography they have when applying.

Bibliography

B. Bischoff, Latin Palaeography:  Antiquity and the Middle Ages, transl. from German by D. O’Croinin and D. Ganz (Cambridge, 1990)
M.P. Brown, A Guide to Western Historical Scripts from Antiquity to 1600 (London, 1990)
S.H. Thomson, Latin Bookhands of the Later Middle Ages (Cambridge, 1969)
L.C. Hector, The Handwriting of English Documents, 2nd edn (London, 1968)
E.A. Gooder, Latin for Local History, 2nd edn (London, 1978)

 
Schedule

The day will run as follows:

09.30-10.00  Registration 
10.00-11.00  Teaching
11.00-11.30  Tea and coffee break
11.30-13.00  Teaching
13.00-14.00  Lunch
14.00-15.00  Teaching
15.00-15.30  Tea and coffee break
15.30-17.00  Teaching

Registration will take place in the foyer of the second floor in Senate House (South Block).

Fees are as follows:

Standard One-Day Fee (£100)
Standard Two-Day Fee (£180)

Student One-Day Fee (£80)
Student Two-Day Fee (£140)

Contact: iesevents@sas.ac.uk | tel: 020 7862 8683