LRBS 2021

The London Rare Book School returns in 2021, with a wide range of online courses!

LRBS is a series of intensive online courses on a variety of book-related subjects. LRBS 2021 will take place from 21-25 June (week one), 28 June - 2 July (week two), and 5-9 July (week three). Applications are accepted on a rolling basis until a course is full. 

The courses will consist of live lectures and interactive discussion, as well as pre-recorded sessions. The courses will be delivered via Zoom or Teams, so we recommend that participants join via laptop or desktop.

 

LRBS Week one, 21-25 June 2021

21-25 June | The Medieval Book (Michelle Brown)

This course will provide an intensive introduction to manuscript culture during Late Antiquity, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. The historical contexts for manuscript production will be explored and the landscape populated with some of those who commissioned and made these remarkable works.

Find out more and book here. 

21-25 June | The Book in the Renaissance (Paolo Sachet)

This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of the printed book during the Renaissance, broadly intended as the trans-European cultural renewal building on the recovery of Antiquity and spanning the mid-fourteenth to the mid-seventeenth century. 

Find out more and book here.

21-25 June | A History of Book Collecting and Book Culture (Cynthia Johnston)

This course will pursue a panoptic view of the growth of book culture and the practice of book collecting by tracing the arc of book historical study. 

Find out more and book here. 

 
LRBS Week two, 28 June - 2 July 2021

28 June - 2 July | Provenance in Books (David Pearson)

The primary aim of this course is to develop a personal toolkit to identify and interpret the various kinds of provenance evidence found in books before 1900.  Interest in historical book ownership and what we can learn from individual copies and whole libraries has steadily grown among librarians, scholars and collectors, and more attention is paid to recording it in catalogues. 

Find out more and book here. 

28 June - 2 July | The Book Historian’s Digital Tool-Kit (Christopher Ohge)

This course introduces a variety of digital methods and tools for book history research, in addition to a historical survey of digitisation and electronic books. The primary purpose of this introduction is to give students a view of the landscape of digital research in book history. 

Find out more and book here. 

28 June - 2 July | Introduction to Incunabula: European Printed Books of the Fifteenth Century (Laura Nuvoloni & Elizabeth Savage)

This interdisciplinary, introductory course provides an overview of incunabula (Latin: cradle, swaddling clothes, birthplace), or material printed in the first 50 years of the press, c.1450–1500. Through lectures and guided tasks, participants will learn how printing transformed – and maintained – conventional methods of communication. 

Find out more and book here. 

28 June - 2 July | Modernism and the Book (Lise Jaillant)

This course introduces a variety of digital methods and tools for book history research, in addition to a historical survey of digitisation and electronic books. The primary purpose of this introduction is to give students a view of the landscape of digital research in book history. 

Find out more and book here. 

29 June - 2 July | A History of Maps and Mapping (Katherine Parker)

Maps are simultaneously ubiquitous in everyday life yet also strangely absent from much scholarly work outside the niche field of the history of cartography. How to catalogue, study, and discuss maps as historical sources for research is a subject that draws insight from critical bibliography, the history of the book, historical geography, and other subjects, making it an interdisciplinary and dynamic field. 

Find out more and book here. 

 
LRBS Week three, 5-9 July 2021

5-9 July | The Book in the Ancient World (Marigold Norbye)

This course is an intensive survey of the origins of, and the changes in, textual culture that took place between c. 3100 BC and 500 AD, covering Egyptian, Greek and Roman book cultures. It will set these changes into their related historical contexts and place close emphasis on the material nature of writing and book construction. 

Find out more and book here. 

5-9 July | The Queer Book (Brooke Palmieri)

This course draws upon elements from the vibrant field of queer studies to restructure our understanding of media and materiality. 

Find out more and book here. 

5-9 July | Gutenberg’s Bible: Back to the Evidence (Elizabeth Savage and Eric White)

This course introduces the Gutenberg Bible, printed in Mainz ca. 1455, the first substantial book printed in Europe with moveable type.

Find out more and book here. 

7-9 July | A History of Chapbooks in Britain c.1650-1900 (Dr Giles Bergel)

This course will survey the production, content and reception of the chapbook, covering its producers and distributors; readers and collectors; rediscovery by book historians; and its meaning and legacy today. 

Find out more and book here. 

 

Bursaries

For 2021, we are pleased to be able to offer a limited number of bursaries for the summer sessions for both short and long courses. Bursaries are awarded from our partners the Bibliographical Society, the Antiquarian Booksellers Association, and the Institute's Sambrook Fund

There is space on the booking form to specify if you would like to apply for a bursary. Bursary applications close on Tuesday 4 May 2021. You will hear back from us a few weeks after the closing date. Please note that you will be expected to pay up front for the course and if your bursary application is successful you will be issued a refund.*

*In limited circumstances where you cannot pay up front please contact iesevents@sas.ac.uk

Taking courses for credit

We offer postgraduate credit for summer LRBS courses at the Institute of English Studies, which is part of the School of Advanced Study, University of London.

Support Us

The London Rare Books School is grateful to receive donations in support of its continuing mission to promote the study of all areas of bibliography and the history of the book. In particular, we welcome support that enables the subject to be embraced by a wider constituency of students within and beyond the academy.